Corporate Crime Essays (Examples)

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Corporate Roles in Environmental Ethics

Words: 5925 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39363295

Corporate Social esponsibility and Environmental Ethics

Abstract/Introduction -- No one can argue that the international business community is becoming more and more complex as a result of globalism. In turn, this complexity is driven by an increasing understanding of sustainability, going "green," and bringing ethical and moral philosophy into the business community. British Telecom, for instance, noted in 2007 that it had reduced its carbon footprint by 60% since 1996, setting itself a target of 80% reductions by 2016 (Hawser, 2007). Francois Barrault, CEO, BT Global Services, said that by supporting sustainability his company hoped not only to reduce its carbon footprint but also to attract younger people who prefer to work for environmentally and socially responsible companies. He didn't always think that way, though. Barrault said that when he first met former U.S. vice president and environmental activist Al Gore, who showed him pictures of icecaps melting, he thought…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Career Services. The University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from:

http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/careers.

Corporate Social Responsibility in the Global Supply Chain.. APEC

Human Resources Development Working Group. Retrieved from:  http://hrd.apec.org/index.php/Corporate_Social_Responsibility_in_the_Global_Supply_Chain .
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Corporate Deviance in Their Seminal

Words: 610 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41396357



Sutherland was quite critical of why some crimes were defined as deviant, while society appears more tolerant of other transgressions. For example, individual theft is seen as causing great harm, while the harm caused by illegal pollution and the dissemination of hazardous waste are hardly recognized. In 2002, for example, the Carnival Company, a Florida-based cruise company which operates 40 ships, was convicted of falsifying its oil record books. The company under-reported the levels of oil in the bilge water it discharged. The higher levels of oil threatened ocean life. To avoid prosecution, Carnival agreed to pay $18 million in fines (Ferro 2003).

Though Carnival was guilty of wrongdoing, few members of the general public at the time would go so far as to define Carnival's actions as criminally deviant.

In summary, both functionalist and social labeling theories help to explain how corporate deviance are both defined and addressed in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ferro, Jeffrey. 2003. "White-Collar Crime." Crime: A Serious American Problem. Reproduced in Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Mich.: Gale Group. http://0-galenet.galegroup.com.catalog.houstonlibrary.org:80/servlet/OVRC

Friedrichs, David O. 1996. Trusted Criminals: White Collar Crime in Contemporary Society. New York: Wadsworth.

Sutherland, Edwin H. 1983. White Collar Crime: The Uncut Version. Westport: Greenwood Publishing Group
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Corporate Responsibility Issues

Words: 639 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33080701

Corporate Social Responsibility Issues

Corporate responsibility in matters of social significance has taken a very public position over the past few years, due in large part to the major scandals and corruption related to Enron and other corporations. Two issues regarding corporate social responsibility will be highlighted in this paper, including corporate responsibility and e-commerce, and corporate responsibility vis-a-vis Internet Communications.

Corporate Responsibility Regarding Internet Communication

Is it ethical for an American corporation with a global reach to participate in censorship? That is the question that dogged the search and media giant Google recently. An article in the Journal of Internet Law (Cannici, 2009) points out that, as background to this problem, there has been, starting in 2006, controversy when U.S. technology firms acquiesce to the demands of foreign dictatorships. In fact there was outrage on an international level when Yahoo, an important and influential media company in the U.S.,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cannici, William J. (2009). The Global Online Freedom Act: Combating American Businesses

That Facilitate Internet Censorship in China. Journal of Internet Law, 12(11), 3-17.

Chen, Stephen. (2010). Corporate Responsibilities in Internet -- Enabled Social Networks.

Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 90, 523-536.
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Corporate Character Individual Res as

Words: 3677 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4261060

WorldCom (CEO Bernard Ebbers) supported by years of profitability arising from the deregulation of phone companies was a fast moving stock that was highly toted by stock specialists as a must buy, even while it was seriously hemorrhaging from bad and fraudulent business deals and its own shoddy accounting, cover ups and bad investment deals.

WorldCom quickly supplanted at&T as the favorite of many investors, based heavily on Grubman's recommendations. The investment world quickly sang WorldCom's praises as a result. A technology magazine, Network World, named it one of the ten most powerful companies, behind only Cisco and Microsoft. After listing its virtues, the magazine went on to conclude that, "MCI WorldCom will probably be a keeper on this list." 18 as for its investment virtues, Grubman claimed that it was a traditional "widows and orphans" stock, to be held for the long-term. Based partially upon his recommendations, Fortune listed…… [Read More]

References

Beauchamp, Tom. L. Bowie, Norman. E. Ethical Theory and Business 7th Ed. New York: Prentice Hall, 2003.

Dalla Costa, John. The Ethical Imperative Why Moral Leadership Is Good Business. Reading, MA: Perseus Publishing,1998.

Fox, Loren. Enron: The Rise and Fall. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2003.

Geisst, Charles R. Wall Street: A History: from Its Beginnings to the Fall of Enron. New York: Oxford University Press. 2004.
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Corporate Business Marketing Structure Analysis of the

Words: 1328 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59908611

Corporate Business Marketing Structure

Analysis of the Sony Corporation's Market Structure

Sony Corporation is a leader in consumer and professional electronics around the world. It is a company founded in Japan in 1946 with headquarters in Tokyo, Japan. Sony produces a variety of products such as cameras, headphones, speakers, and more. Sony Corporation also generates a great deal of income in the entertainment industry, distributing media such and film and television. It is a brand recognized for quality worldwide. This is a company that makes business partnerships that are prudent and profitable. Japanese cultural and economic histories influence and contribute to Sony's market structure and general success.

Sony is heavily involved with audio recording and engineering technologies. It is possible to construct and supply and high caliber, professional recording studio using only Sony products. This corporation has an outstanding reputation for its cameras. Sony produces numerous consumer cameras, lenses, and…… [Read More]

Reference:

Barrett, Jimmy, Mike Bridges, Steve Day, Matt Klingman, & Chris Mattie. Sony Inc. [Webpage] http://www.boydassociates.net, 2011, [cited 2011]. Available from http://www.boydassociates.net/Stonehill/bus336/BUS336%20grp%20projects/Sony%20Inc.pdf
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What Motivates People or Corporations to Partake in Enterprise Crime

Words: 3638 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64212292

motivates people or corporations to partake in enterprise crime?

Among the peculiar aspects that come with business ethics, as in comparison with other domain names of applied ethics, is it handles a wide array of human matters which are more often than not stricken by serious criminality, as well as an institutional structure and atmosphere that is also oftentimes noticeably criminally inclined (Hilts, 2003). The oddity of the situation may also be lost on professionals within the area. It's quite common, for example, at business ethics discussions for most of presentations to become more concerned with straight-forward criminality and they tend to avoid ethical issues within these debates which are actually where we find frequent questions regarding where the correct strategy for countering crimes lies. In this way, all of the discussions of the 'ethics dilemmas' at the beginning of the twenty-first century continues to be very deceptive, since the…… [Read More]

References

Doris, J.: 2002, Lack of Character (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge).

Friedrichs, D. O. And Schwartz, M.D. (2008). Low Self-Control and High Organizational Control: The Paradoxes of White Collar Crimes. In E. Goode (Ed.), Out of Control? Assessing the general theory of crime (pp. 145-159). Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press

Heath, J. 2008, Business Ethics and Moral Motivation: A Criminological Perspective. Journal of Business Ethics, 83:595 -- 614.

Heath, J.: 2006, 'Business Ethics Without Stakeholders', Business Ethics Quarterly 16, 533 -- 557.
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Crime Discuss Reasons Crime Increased Todays Society

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83252970

crime discuss reasons crime increased todays society. (Submit a 500

Crime is a transgression of the law on the part of a person or an organization. In order for a crime to be committed, there has to be some formal law enacted which prohibits an action or an occurrence. Furthermore, that law has to then be transgressed for a crime to take place. One of the main areas of crime is violent crime. Violent crime occurs when individuals act aggressively or hostilely towards one another, and choose to inflict corporal pain and punishment. This sort of crime can take place virtually anywhere. In the United States, for example, violent crime occurs fairly regularly in urban environments. Common types of violent crime include shootings, stabbings, and physical violence in the form of fighting.

Violent crime is actually stratified into blue collar crime, which is crime committed by working class people. Working…… [Read More]

References

Valdmanis, T. (2008). "Senate report blasts SEC's Enron oversight." USA Today. Retrieved from  http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/industries/banking/2002-10-06-sec_x.htm
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Crime Doesn't Pay Sometimes Is a Whole

Words: 1917 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7829038

crime doesn't pay sometimes is a whole point which can't be applicable, especially when you're trusted with the management of multi-billion dollar corporation, and to be in charge of the well -- being of thousand of people. It's so difficult to criminalize someone's action, if such action doesn't cause any harm to anyone or if someone doing a lot of critical charity works. The case of Richard M. crushy can be described as one of the most important scenario which can acts as one of the success stories, showing how far most of these business ethnical values can be abused to hurt everyone for a period of time. As stated by Jennings (2012) in his book "Business Ethnics Class" unethical practices can only last for a short time, and nothing helpful can be found out of it.

However, the carpenter teachings regarding people who do not pursue wisdom that are…… [Read More]

Sense of entitlement

Jennings (2004a) identified that many corporate cultures are less concerned about their fraud because of their philanthropic endeavors. These good works seem to blind them to their culpability and cause them to both "overestimate their ability and underestimate the risk of being found out" (p. 17). This sense of entitlement constitutes two of the factors that Jennings identifies as "Wild West behaviors" (p. 13) that are common to organizations that ethically collapse; A "culture of innovation like no other" and a "culture of social responsibility" (p. 17). She notes that "the attitude develops slowly as the other factors of iconic status and high levels of success consume the individual right up to a feeling of invincibility" (p. 17). This is amply demonstrated in the behavior of Richard Scrushy, who despite all of the evidence arrayed against him continues to proclaim his innocence of any wrong doing.

Jennings (2004b) identified common red flags that would point to corporate counsel that an investigation into the accounting of the firm might be in order. She indicated that in HealthSouth's case legal counsel "fits the inaction mold" (p. 45), and "like executives at WorldCom, Enron, and Tyco, executives at HealthSouth, particularly Scrushy, lived lavish lives" (p. 46). She concludes that "the presence of many elaborate perks is a red flag all can see" (p. 46). It is these perks that, according to Neeley & Boyd (2010) "encourage[s] executives to take excessive risk with other people's money" (p. 548).
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Corporate World According to Prior Research Studies

Words: 3497 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19036124

Corporate World

According to prior research studies, plagiarism is not just appearing in the academic environment. Now, plagiarism is being seen in corporate America as a way to "adjust" information that might otherwise seem unfavorable to stakeholders, higher-ups, or others who will be provided information regarding something to do with the company. Financial issues are often a part of the plagiarism issue, but there are other concerns that are not related to the company's finances. No matter what concerns a corporation has, it should be honest about those concerns and not attempt to cover them up with dishonesty of any kind. There are other dishonest practices other than plagiarism that are used in corporations today, but plagiarism is one of the more common problems that is discovered. It appears to be acceptable until it is discovered, and it is important that the researcher examines just how much plagiarism is permeating…… [Read More]

References

Aguilera, R., & Vadera, A. (2008). The dark side of authority: Antecedents, mechanisms, and outcomes of organizational corruption. Journal of Business Ethics, 77, 431-449.

Bailey, J. (2008, January). Whistleblowing: An international perspective. Internal Auditing, 23, 20-25.

Dewey, J. (1963). Experience and education. New York, NY: Collier Books.

Haggerty, J., & McKinnon, J. (2004, September 24). Fannie Mae ousters might come. Wall Street Journal, p. A12.
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Corporate Flaws That Contributed to the Gulf of Mexico Spill

Words: 1990 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44928084

corporate and public shortcomings that arguably resulted in the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The oil spill marked the U.S.'s worst environmental disaster. Whilst identifying the corporate and state cover-ups the triggered the disaster, this study recommends some of the solutions that can be adopted to prevent future disasters. BP's corporate flaws are largely to blame for the disaster.

The 20th of April of 2010 marked the largest oil spill disaster in the U.S. referred to as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (Lehner & Deans 2010). On this day, a fire explosion resulted in the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig. The catastrophe led to the deaths of 11 workers. BP owned the oil well while Halliburton did the cementing of the well. Transocean Company was the owner of the rig. The three companies engaged in blame games while efforts to deter the oil spill lasted…… [Read More]

References

Alexander, K. (2010, 4 June). "The 2010 Oil Spill: Minerals Management Service (MMS) and National Environment Policy Act (NEPA)" Congressional Research Service 7-5700 www.crs.gov R41265.

Bradshaw, E.A. (2014). State-Corporate Environmental Cover-Up: The Response to the 2010 Gulf of Mexico Oil. State Crime Journal, ISSN 2046-6056, 10/2014, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp. 163-181

Chen, J.C. (2010). "Bolstering Unethical Leaders: The Role Of The Media, Financial Analysts And Shareholders" Journal of Public Affairs, 10, 200 -- 215.

Gray, R. (2010). "Is Accounting for Sustainability Actually Accounting for Sustainability... And How Would We Know? An Exploration Of Narratives Of Organizations And The Planet." Accounting, Organizations, and Society. 35, 47-62.
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Juvenile Delinquency and Crime's Impact

Words: 2126 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83690595

Crime and Its Impact on Youth

Crime impacts children differently than it does adults. This paper examines the differences and the reasons children are affected uniquely by crime. It looks in particularly at the multiple theories that can be used to explain these impacts, such as Strain Theory and Social Control Theory. It also identifies the unique challenges that children and adults face as they struggle to cope both with the environments in which they live and the criminal justice systems that confront them. The paper concludes that children are uniquely impacted by crime because they are still in their developmental stage, wherein their psychology and physicality are still highly susceptible to external influences.

Introduction

Children suffer from the effects of crime in different ways from adults. This is primarily due to the fact that children are still developing, both cognitively and physically, whereas adults are already developed. Crime thus…… [Read More]

References

Agnew, R. (2008). Strain Theory. In V. Parrillo (Ed.), Encyclopedia of social problems.

(pp. 904-906). Thousand Oaks: SAGE.

Barrett, D., Ju, S., Katsiyannis, A., Zhang, D. (2015). Females in the juvenile justice system: influences on delinquency and recidivism. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24: 427-433.

Benns, W. (2015). American Slavery, Reinvented. The Atlantic. Retrieved from http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/09/prison-labor-in-america/406177/
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History of Organized Crime in the US

Words: 4392 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65336839

Org Crime

Organized crime underwrites the bulk of political, social, and economic history in America. What has often been mentioned in passing as legitimate business activities can and often should be reframed as organized crime, such as the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the colonial mercantilism that it supported (Woodiwiss, 2003). When organized crime is taken out of its Hollywood context, which portrays organized crime as an immigrant problem, some patterns emerge that clarify the function and structure of organized crime in America. Organized crime tends to flourish in "societies that experience rapid and intense social change," (Albini et al. 1995, p. 213). This is why the United States has been a hot spring of organized crime in various manifestations throughout the nation's history. In only a few hundred years, the United States has gone from colonial outpost to global superpower. apid change and cultural transformation foment organized crime, as do…… [Read More]

References

Abadinsky, H. (2013). Organized Crime. Belmont: Wadsworth

Albanese, J.S. (2011). Organized Crime in Our Times. 6th Edition. Burlington: Elsevier.

Albini, J.L. et al. (1995). Russian organized crime: Its history, structure, and function. Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 11(4), 213-243.

Cornell University Law School. (2014). 18 U.S. Code § 1961 -- Definitions. Retrieved online: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/1961
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Future of Eurasian Organized Crime

Words: 7401 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30485101

Ashley, Assistant Director, Criminal Investigative Division of the FI relates that in 1991: "...the U.S. Attorney's office in Los Angeles charged 13 defendants in a $1 billion false medical billing scheme that was headed by two Russian emigre brothers. On September 20, 1994, the alleged ringleader was sentenced to 21 years in prison for fraud, conspiracy, racketeering, and money laundering. He was also ordered to forfeit $50 million in assets, pay more than $41 million in restitution to government agencies and insurance companies victimized by the scheme." (2003) Ashley relates that the first Eurasian organized crime investigation of a significant nature involved a major underworld figure in the United States and specifically, Vyacheslav Ivankov who is a powerful Eurasian organized crime boss. Ashley states that Ivankov "...led an international criminal organization that operated in numerous cities in Europe, Canada, and the United States, chiefly New York, London, Toronto, Vienna, udapest,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Albini, Joseph L. And R.E. Rogers. "Proposed Solutions to the Organized Crime Problem in Russia." Demokratizatsiya Winter 1998: p. 103.

Crime Without Punishment." (1999) the Economist August 28, 1999 the Makings of a Molotov Cocktail. The Economist 344, no. 8025.

Edward H. Sutherland (nd) Differential Association Theory. Online Criminology FSU.EDU available at http://www.criminology.fsu.edu/crimtheory/sutherland.html

Eurasian, Italian and Balkan Organized Crime (2003) Testimony of Grant D. Ashley, Assistant Director, Criminal Investigative Division, FBI Before the Subcommittee on European Affairs, Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate. 30 Oct. 2003. Federal Bureau of Investigations. Online available at http://www.fbi.gov/congress/congress03/ashley103003.htm
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Corp Gov UAE Corporate Governance

Words: 2120 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79913915

Clearly, he companies engaged in this practice were operating with direct intention, and a roper governance system would have made this obvious and prevented it.

Software Spying

In another telecommunications case, a company was found to have included spyware in a company-sponsored "software upgrade" to users' cell phones, that enabled the company to collect confidential information from users' phones without their consent (Khaleej Times, 2009). Not only is this practice clearly unethical, but it is also illegal despite a lack of stringency in the detection of such crimes and the prosecution of large-scale corporate offenders such as telecommunications companies. Again, greater transparency and internal control would have allowed this practice to be discovered much sooner, and the risk of discovery almost certainly would have prevented this action from ever occurring. Corporate governance works best when it is so strong it is only rarely and usually accidentally tested; when purposeful actions…… [Read More]

References

ADCCG. (2012). Accessed 7 May 2012. http://www.adccg.ae/

ADX. (2012). Mission & Vision. Accessed 7 May 2012.  http://www.adx.ae/English/AboutADX/Pages/MissionVision.aspx 

Creffield, L. (2007). Why you can't block Skype. Accessed 7 May 2012. http://www.ameinfo.com/93716.html

Etisalat. (2011). 2010 Annual Report.
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Firestone Tire White Collar Crime

Words: 1731 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47083379

corporate or white-collar crime. Specifically, it will discuss the Firestone Tire executives that allowed faulty tires to remain on U.S. vehicles. In mid-2000, Bridgestone/Firestone Tires began a recall of some of their tires that would turn into a massive recall and a public relations nightmare. The underlying problem with the recall, besides public opinion and the cost, was the issue that popped to the surface as the recall began to take on momentum. There was surprising evidence that Firestone and Ford had known about the defect since at least 1994, and had even recalled tires in other countries, but allowed them to remain on Ford Explorers in the United States, leading to hundreds of deaths and injuries in their failure to recall the tires.

In August 2000, Bridgestone/Firestone CEO Masatoshi Ono and the Ford Motor Company initiated a recall of millions of Firestone tires produced in a Decatur, Illinois plant.…… [Read More]

References

Garten, J.E. (2000). The mind of the CEO. New York: Basic Books.

Guest, J. (2002). Colston E. Warne lecture: Consumers and consumerism in America today. Journal of Consumer Affairs, 36(2), 139+.

Healey, J.R. (2000). Firestone may have known of trouble in '94. Retrieved 16 April 2009 from the U.S.A. Today Web site: http://www.usatoday.com/money/consumer/autos/mauto870.htm.

Mashaw, J.L. (2003). Law and engineering: In search of the law-science problem. Law and Contemporary Problems, 66(4), 135+.
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Dark Figure of Crime

Words: 2470 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29574271

Dark Figure of Crime

The amount of crime in society gets known when it is reported to the police, through public response to victim surveys and studies of offenders who admit committing crime, and when transmitted to other agencies, such as hospital accident wards, battered women's refuge centers and similar ones (Young 2001). Other than these, the amount of crime committed is unknown. That unknown volume (of crime) that does not get reported, thus not registered, in criminal statistics, constitutes the dark figure of crime.

Statistician Adolphe Quetelet of the 1830s recognized this problem and modern statisticians do, too. All current methods of collecting crime incidence still have a dark figure. Victimization surveys, like the ritish Crime Survey (CS) and the National Crime Survey (NCS) are more accurate (Young). In 2000, CS estimated that the dark figure, or the actual extent of crime, was 4 1/2 more than what was…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dougherty, J. (2000) Britain, Australia Top U.S. In Violent Crime. World Net Daily. http://power.consumercide.com/aust-uk-us-crimefigs.html

George, M. (2002) Tackling Crimes: Drug Links. BBC News Online. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/uk/2253559.shtm

Kury, H. (2000) Concerning the Dark Figure of Crime in Eastern Europe. Max-Planck Institute. http://www.asc41/www/2000/absdm005.htm

Mason, T. (1991) Official Statistics and the Dark Figure. Lecture 2, p 196. Social Trends. HMSO: Central Statistical Office. http://peso-click-internet.fr/tmason/WebPages/Deviance/Deviance2.htm
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How to Prevent Violent Crime in My Personal and Professional Life

Words: 1919 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31972571

Doing this ensures early identification of an unknown crime hence, the adoption of proactive approaches against it. Achieving this relies on the establishment of a positive relationship between the police and the truck drivers (U.S., 2001).

Establishing park watch in the community also helps in preventing violent crime since it addresses a wide range of criminal acts. The program aims at enlisting the users of the park and neighbors to take the responsibility of watching over the parks. Significant evidence shows that involving the youth in activities that involve them in building the community reduces the rates of violent crimes in the community. Engaging the youth in different activities such as cleaning the parks and recreational spaces creates a healthy environment that attack a variety of economic activities. Through this, the unemployed youth acquires alternative source of income contributing to the minimization of violent crimes caused by youth unemployment. Other…… [Read More]

References

Gilligan, J. (2001). Preventing violence. New York: Thames & Hudson.

Texas Department of Criminal Justice Community Justice Assistance Division (2014). Battering Intervention and Prevention Program (BIPP) Accreditation Guideline. New York: Texas Department of Criminal Justice.

Workplace Violence Prevention. (n.d.). FBI. Retrieved April 25, 2014, from http://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/law-enforcement-bulletin/january2011/workplace_violence_prevention

(U.S.), O. Of the S.G., (U.S.), N.C. For I.P. And C., (U.S.), N.I. Of M.H., & (U.S.), C. For M.H.S. (2001). Chapter 5 -- Prevention and Intervention. Text. Retrieved April 25, 2014, from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK44295/
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Transnational Crime

Words: 1795 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19088091

Human Trafficking

Transnational crime

Human trafficking is defined as the trade in humans for the purposes of forced labor, sexual slavery, or organ extraction Avdan, 2012.

It has been estimated that human trafficking is a lucrative industry that represents around $32 billion per year. Human trafficking is a serious crime that violates human rights. This trade affects almost all countries in the world. There are thousands of people (men, women, and children) who fall in the hands of traffickers. The traffickers are mostly located in the home country of the victims. The recruitment, transfer, transportation, receipt, or harboring of persons by using threats, coercion, force, abduction, deception, fraud, or power is also referred to as human trafficking. The traffickers are mainly intent in exploiting these persons for their own benefit.

Human trafficking should not be confused with people smuggling. People smuggling usually involves people hiring an individual who will transport…… [Read More]

References

Avdan, N. (2012). Human trafficking and migration control policy: vicious or virtuous cycle? Journal of Public Policy, 32(3), 171-205. doi: 10.2307/23351562

Department of Justice. (March 24, 2011). Sex Trafficking Ring Leader Sentenced to 40 Years in Prison, from http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2011/March/11-crt-373.html

Feingold, D.A. (2005). Human Trafficking. Foreign Policy (150), 26-32. doi: 10.2307/30048506
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Role of Technology in Corporate and Social

Words: 2557 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96165638

ole of Technology in Corporate and Social esponsibility

Insider trading. The insider trading case that has become most prominent is that against aj ajaratnam who ran the hedgefund Galleon Group, and was charged along with his co-defendant, Danielle Chiesi, a former consultant with New Castle Funds, LLC ("Insider Trading," 2010). ajaratnam was convicted of 14 counts of insider trading, which makes this case the largest scheme concocted by a hedge fund ("Insider Trading," 2010). ajaratnam's sentence was 11 years in prison accompanied by a $10 million fine ("Insider Trading," 2010). ajaratnam was part of a "triangle of trust" that functioned as a deliberately corrupt business model in which inside information is fed through networks of experts to traders within various companies ("Insider Trading," 2010). Along with five others, ajaratnam worked with a network of consultants and insiders to net in excess of $20 million between the years 2006 to 2009…… [Read More]

References

Angwin, J. (2010, July 30). The new gold mine: Your secrets. The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703940904575395073512989404.html A web of insider trading charges. (2010, April 1). The New York Times. Retrieved http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/

2010/04/01/business/01galleon.html?ref=insidertrading

Insider Trading, Times Topics, (2011, December 6). The New York Times. Retrieved http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/subjects/i/insider_trading/index.html

Representative Stearns introduces consumer privacy protection act. (2011, April 15). Privacy and information Security Law Blog. Hunton & Williams LLP. Retrieved http://www.huntonprivacyblog.com/2011/04/articles/representative-stearns-introduces-consumer-privacy-protection
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Growth of Organized Crime Is Best Understood

Words: 2712 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37535573

growth of organized crime is best understood when situated within a broader societal context. Illustrate why this is so, giving specific examples from the lectures / required readings. Why is this understanding important for controlling organized crime?

It is prudent to consider organized crime within the broader societal context because research evidence and criminology theory has shown that such crime does not occur in isolation; rather, it is driven by a set of societal factors ranging from cultural values to corruption, political failures, and economic issues. Society, therefore, does have a hand in the emergence and continued development of organized crime; as a matter of fact, organized crime is integrated into society, and unless we can effectively conceptualize and understand society's role in fueling the same, we may not be able to devise a sustainable solution to the issue of organized crime.

Criminology theory and models give credence to the…… [Read More]

References

Beare, M. (2002). Organized Corporate Criminality -- Tobacco Smuggling between Canada and the U.S. Crime, Law and Social Change, 37(3), 225-243.

Finckenauer, J.O. (2005). Problems of Definition: What is Organized Crime? Trends in Organized Crime, 8(3), 63-83.

Finckenauer, J.O. & Voronin, Y.A. (2001). The Threat of Russian Organized Crime: Issues in International Crime. The U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved July 29, 2015 from http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/187085.pdf

Galeotti, M. (2008). Criminal Histories: An Introduction. Global Crime, 9(1), 1-7.
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Economic Effects of Crime in

Words: 878 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58078888



Throughout most of the 20th Century, organized crime accounted for a tremendous economic costs passed along to consumers, particularly (but hardly exclusively) in large cities like New York, and Chicago, among many others. Originally formed in this country during the Prohibition years in the 1920s, the criminal enterprises that exploited the black market for illegal liquor subsequently branched out to infiltrate other large industries, such as construction, food and liquor distribution, interstate trucking, waste disposal, and the garment industry.

Primarily by penetrating into the leadership organization of unionized industries, organized crime managed to siphon off public funds, "skim" illegal profits from large corporations, and control entire otherwise legitimate industries through intimidation, including labor strikes initiated via its control of labor unions. The result increased the cost of almost everything sold to consumers in the form of goods and services throughout much of the country. In recent years, increased federal law…… [Read More]

References

Ballezza, R. (2007) the Social Security Card Application Process: Identity and Credit Card Fraud Issues; FBI Law Enforcement Journal, Vol. 76 No. 5, May/07

Hendrie, E. (2006) Breaking the Bank; FBI Law Enforcement Journal, Vol. 75

No. 7, Jul/06

U.S. Department of Justice (2007) Uniform Crime Reports. Federal Bureau of Investigation Homepage. Accessed October 23, 2007, at http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/ucr.htm#cius
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Personal Reflection on Crime

Words: 988 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16574720

personal stance on the privatization of prisons versus traditional government run-facilities is against. I believe privatized prisons seek maximum profit at the expense of prisoners. That means lower quality food, cramped and full facilities, and limited rights to prisoners. Furthermore, because more prisoners, equals higher profits, private prisons may and have sought to lobby for policy that makes arresting people easier and keeping them behind bars easier. "The two largest for-profit prison companies in the United States -- GEO and Corrections Corporation of America -- and their associates have funneled more than $10 million to candidates since 1989 and have spent nearly $25 million on lobbying efforts" (Cohen, 2015).

This kind of behavior seems unethical, thus leading to the notion that it is unethical for prisons to focus on profit. Lobbying for bills and legislature that would favor deregulation of private prison processes and increasing the number of prisoners sent…… [Read More]

References

Cohen, M. (2015, April 28). How for-profit prisons have become the biggest lobby no one is talking about - The Washington Post. Retrieved from  http://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2015/04/28/how-for-profit-prisons-have-become-the-biggest-lobby-no-one-is-talking-about/?utm_term=.eee78d0b057d 

Lyons, B. J. (2016, September 22). 3 New York state prison guards charged with inmate beating - Times Union. Retrieved from http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/3-state-prison-guards-charged-with-inmate-beating-9236825.php

Savage, D. G. (2016, August 18). Justice Department will phase out private prisons - LA Times. Retrieved from  http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-privateprisons-20160818-snap-story.html
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Pretexting When Secrets Regarding Corporate

Words: 888 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26845014

Once it was announced, the board asked Keyworth to resign. At that point, Perkins also quit in a huff. ut that was not all. He also launched a campaign in order to try and discredit Dunn, who he believed had betrayed his trust.

It seems that the charges brought against Dunn are largely the result of Perkins's disinformation and discrediting campaign against her. Perkins is an enormously wealthy, powerful individual, who not only sent out a mass e-mail attempting to discredit Dunn - an e-mail that was said to have influenced the media - but also went to law enforcement officials alongside his lawyers in order to convince them that she had orchestrated an investigation that included the use of pretexting as a method. In the words of Dunn, "If you have enough money and you're willing to spend enough, you can buy and sell somebody's reputation." Apparently, this is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

CBS News. "Patricia Dunn: I Am Innocent." Palo Alto, CA, Oct. 8. 2006. Retrieved November 28, 2007 at http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/10/05/60minutes/main2069430.shtml.

Kirkpatrick, David. "The Peculiar Logic of Patricia Dunn." CNNmoney.com. September 15, 2006. Retrieved November 28, 2007 at http://money.cnn.com/2006/09/15/technology/FastForward_HP.fortune/index.htm.
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Impact on Society of White Collar Crime

Words: 1536 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76939793

White Collar Crime on the Economy and Society

The objective of this study is to examine the impact of white collar crime on the economy and society.

White Collar Crime is reported to be a term that Edwin Southerland, Sociologist of Criminology defined and one that identifies "those illegal non-violent activities that involve traditional notions of deceit, deception, concealment, manipulation, breach of trust or illegal circumvention." (Soto, 2008, p. 1) These types of crimes are such that are generally committed by government agents and business professionals. (Soto, 2008, paraphrased) The Legal Institute at Cornell Law School defines white collar crime as "crime committed by a person of respectability and high social status in the course of his occupation." (Wayne State University, 2011, p. 1)

Expert Panel eports on White Collar Crime

It is reported that in 2011 an expert panel reported on white collar crime and stated that the Federal…… [Read More]

References

Bank of Credit and Commerce International (nd) American Patriots Freedom Network. Retrieved from:  http://www.apfn.org/apfn/BCCI.htm 

Soto, Melanie (2008) White Collar Crime and Its Effects on Consumers (2008) Articlesbase. 22 July 2008. Retrieved from:  http://www.articlesbase.com/economics-articles/white-collar-crime-and-its-effects-on-consumers-493020.html 

Prestigious Panel Examines Impact of White Collar Crime (2011) Wayne State University. 4 Apr, 2011. Retrieved from: http://media.wayne.edu/2011/04/04/prestigious-panel-examines-impact-of-white-collar

Kouri, J. (2005) White Collar Crime is Not Victimless. Renew America. 6 Dec 2005. Retrieved from:  http://www.renewamerica.com/columns/kouri/051206
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White Collar Entrepreneurial Crime Allen Stanford Briefly

Words: 1542 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83471570

hite Collar

Entrepreneurial Crime

Allen Stanford

Briefly describe the entrepreneurial crime you researched.

In 2009, the Antigua/Texas-based global financial group (which was made up several subsidiaries that were owned by the same investment firm) owned by R. Allen Stanford was charged with scamming their customers by the Securities and Exchange Commission. Stanford Financial Group was charged with fraud on the basis that they deceptively sold consumers over seven billion dollars in deposit certificates. The company advertised the CDs as safe investments to their clients yet they paid them a rate of return that was inconsistently higher than the market rate. The rate brought in many clients however the investments were not as safe as they were advertised. Instead of backing the investments with safe assets, the company used the funds to invest in high-risk mortgage funds and other risky investments. The sentencing memorandum after Stanford was convicted reads as follows:…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Drawbaugh, K., & Aubin, D. (2012, July 30). Analysis: A decade on, is Sarbanes-Oxley working? Retrieved from Reuters: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/07/30/us-financial-sarbox-idUSBRE86Q1BY20120730

Henning, P. (2012, June 11). Viewing Financial Crimes as Economic Homicide. Retrieved from DealB%k: http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2012/06/11/viewing-financial-crimes-as-economic-homicide/?ref=stanfordfinancialgroup

Reuters. (2012, July 3). Judge's Ruling Is Blow to Victims of Stanford Scheme. Retrieved from The New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/04/business/sec-loses-ruling-in-stanford-ponzi-scheme-case.html?ref=stanfordfinancialgroup

The Economist. (2005, May 19). A price worth paying? Retrieved from The Economist:  http://www.economist.com/node/3984019
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Sociology of Crime Primarily Using

Words: 3045 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64968696



FIGHT AGAINST TEOISM

A similar crime was witnessed on September 11, 2001. The United States of America saw the sad death of thousands of innocent people just because some people wanted to acquire their goals. This followed an economic crisis and many innocent civilians faced unnecessary loss of jobs. The political environment has ever since been changing constantly and the United States went into war against Afghanistan. After Afghanistan there was a pre-emptive action on Iraq against the regime of Saddam Hussein who was accused of possessing weapons of mass destruction.

With terrorism becoming more organized, the law enforcement bodies try to formulate more laws to provide security to their citizens. There have been many congressional debates on the Antiterrorism and the Immigration policies of the United States. The immigration laws have been made stricter with a better screening of who comes in and who does not. ecently the citizens…… [Read More]

REFERENCES:

(1) The History Guide -- Lectures on Modern European Intellectual History [http://www.historyguide.org/intellect/marx.html] Accessed on 27/08/2005

(2) Frank Elwell - The Sociology of Karl Marx [http://www.faculty.rsu.edu/~felwell/Theorists/Marx/#Printable%20Version] Accessed on 27/08/2005

(3) Conflict Theories [ http://www.sociology.org.uk/p2t3.htm ] Accessed on 27/08/2005

(4) Council on Foreign Relations [http://cfrterrorism.org/home/] Accessed on 27/08/2005
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The Role of Sarbanes Oxley Act in Curbing Corporate Fraud

Words: 2717 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86050143

Tesco’s Fraud in the Accounting Information System

The Accounting Information Systems (AIS) plays a central part in the business computing structure of any organization. AIS deals with the classification, collection, storage, monitoring, and conversion of the company’s data into information utilized for internal control and reporting (Smith, 2016). Once an organization adopts an Accounting Information System, they can keep accurate records, and manage the assets of the organizations properly. The management utilizes AIS to guarantee that there are suitable access and separation of duty controls. With such restrictions, the administration can hold the employees responsible for their interaction with the system. This paper delves into how the components and functions of Tesco’s accounting information system contributed to the 2014 fraud scandal.

Tesco’s Fraud Scandal

Tesco is popular grocery retailer with its head office in Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, U.K. (Colson, 2017). Globally, it is ranked at position nine regarding revenues…… [Read More]

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Different Types of White Collar Crime

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16706505

Pension fraud is a type of white-collar crime, but it can assume many different forms. In "Guilty Plea in Fraud Case Tied to New York Pension," the underlying crime was bribery, which happened to be related to a pension fraud scheme. The State of New York runs and manages a pension for its residents. It invests money workers pay into the pension. In this case, state officials accepted about $1 million in gifts in exchange for investing $250 million in pension money into the briber's company. "Looking Out for Number One" describes a slightly different type of pension fraud. In this case, the manager of the pension was defrauded by the investment company, AA Capital Partners. AA Capital Partners seem to have diverted millions of dollars from the pension money to its own dealings, amounting to a type of embezzlement. Thus, pension fraud is not actually a specific type of…… [Read More]

References

"Guilty Plea in Fraud Case Tied to New York Pension." International New York Times. 4 Dec, 2009. Retrieved online: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/04/nyregion/04pension.html?_r=2&

"Identity Theft, Debt Collection, and Payday Loans Top List of Consumer Fraud Complaints," (2014). The Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved online:  http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Latest-News-Wires/2014/0304/Identity-theft-debt-collection-and-payday-loans-top-list-of-consumer-fraud-complaints 

"Looking Out for Number One." Bloomberg Business Week. Retrieved online: http://www.businessweek.com/stories/2006-10-29/looking-out-for-number-one
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Mothers -- Transitioning From Welfare to Corporate

Words: 2273 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96265813

Mothers -- Transitioning from elfare to Corporate America

elfare in the United States is both a complex and controversial subject. The issue focuses on several aspects of public policy: economics, cultural diversity, actualization, incentives, education/training, taxation and even the actual role of the government. e first begin this study with an overview of the idea of a state welfare system, its origins, development, purpose, and particularly view the manner in which the welfare system has changed since the Great Depression. It is then important to understand the implications of the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA) and the change in attitude and policy regarding welfare, and the newer focus on finding ways to train, retrain, or educate those on welfare so they can find gainful employment -- particularly those who move into the corporate world. Challenges, interventions, and potential outcomes are examined, among which looking at the juxtaposition between the fiscal…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burnett, R. (2010, May 28). Social Welfre: Does it Really Help or Does it Really Hurt? Retrieved from The Cypress Times: http://www.thecypresstimes.com/article/Columnists/The_Hard_Truth/SOCIAL_WELFARE_DOES_IT_REALLY_HELP_OR_DOES_IT_REALLY_HURT/30509

Galster, G. (Ed.). (1996). Reality and Research: Social Science and U.S. Urban Policy since 1960. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press.

Gyamfi, P., Brooks-Gun, J., & Jackson, A. (2005). Moving Towards Work: The Effects of Employment Experiences on Welfare-Dependent Women and their Children. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 12(2-3), 39-62.

Hamilton, G. (2002, July). Moving People from Welfare to Work. Retrieved from MDRC Policy Analysis: http://www.mdrc.org/publications/52/summary.html
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Business Law- Corporate Responsibility Irresponsible

Words: 2263 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13269860



At some institutions, loans of this type were actually called "liar loans" by brokers, a reference to the obvious fudging of information they represented (Markels 2007).

A substantial portion (if not a large majority) of new home purchases during that time period involved a fraudulent practice of dishonestly inflating the income and financial health of prospective purchasers. In many instances, the real estate brokers and mortgage brokers precipitated this type of falsification of credit worthiness to facilitate high-commission-generating transactions. They stood to profit without any corresponding risk by virtue of the fact that any risk of default on the initial mortgage obligation would be shifted to other lenders and to investors in stocks connected to the value of mortgage securities on Wall Street (Lowenstein 2007). Even worse, during the process of loan negotiation, many homeowners were encouraged to inflate the appraised value of the property for the purposes of maximizing…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Halbert, T., Ingulli, E. (2000) Law & Ethics in the Business Environment.

Cincinnati: West Legal Studies. Lowenstein, R. (2007) Subprime Time: How Did Home Ownership Become So Rickety? New York Times Magazine; Sept. 2/07. Retrieved July 8, 2008, from the New York Times online website, at http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/02/magazine/02wwln-lede-t.html?_r=1&oref=slogin&pagewanted=print

Markels, a. (2007) Spring Fever: Just How Sick Is the Housing Market. U.S. News & World Report. Vol.142 No. 11 (33-36)

Markels, a.(2007) Yes, Housing Will get Worse. But How Bad?
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Financial Crimes Knights Templar the Order of

Words: 1431 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89247058

Financial Crimes

Knights Templar

The Order of the Knights Templar (Poor Knights of Christ and the Temple of Solomon) was founded in 1118 to protect Christians on pilgrimage to Jerusalem (Blacktorne, 2011). The Order was sanctioned by King Baldwin II of Jerusalem and he quartered the nine original knights in the old stables at the Temple of Solomon. All members had to give over all of their wealth and goods to the Order and take vows of poverty, chastity, piety, and obedience just like other monks (Langue, 2011). A majority of the members joined for life, although a select few were also allowed to join for specific duration.

The Templars' were considered the first international banking organizations. Although this wasn't there specific title they charge a fee (interest) for issuing letters of deposits (checks). Some also view them as a multinational corporation; however the banking reference seems to hold more…… [Read More]

6- BCCI "Bank of Credit and Commerce International

The Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI) was a major international bank founded in 1972 by Agha Hasan Abedi, a Pakistani financier. The Bank was registered in Luxembourg. It operated in 78 countries, had over 400 branches, and had assets in excess of twenty billion making it the seventh largest private bank in the world by assets (Kanas, 2005). In the late 1980's BCCI became the target of a two-year undercover operation conducted by the U.S. Customs Service. This operation concluded with a fake wedding that was attended by BCCI officers and drug dealers from around the world who had established a personal friendship and working relationship with undercover Special Agent Robert Mazur (Lohr, 1991).

After a six-month trial in Tampa, some of the key bank officers were convicted and received lengthy prison sentences. BCCI came under the scrutiny of regulatory bodies and intelligence agencies in the 1980s due to its perceived avoidance of falling under one regulatory banking authority. It was actually set up to be not under any regulatory bodies' control at all. Thus the international bank could help people who wanted to hide money from taxation or even launder money. The true extents of the ties with other banking institutions were never fully uncovered. The prosecutors claimed that they busted the largest money laundering system ever yet many reports at the time feel like they barely scratched the surface (Baquet, 1991).
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Vicarious Liability Corporate Criminal Liability

Words: 1104 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10954567



Another, related doctrine to vicarious liability is that of negligent hiring, in which an employer does not take reasonable precautions to do appropriate background checks of the employee. If a hospital hires a nurse without the necessary qualifications, the hospital may be found liable for any errors the employee performs. However, the hospital might be found vicariously liable if it hires a qualified nurse, but expects the nurse to labor under unreasonable circumstances, such as working back-to-back shifts repeatedly with a skeleton staff, or has the nurse perform her duties with improperly maintained medical devices.

The need for the doctrine of vicarious liability is manifest in the fact that it is necessary for employers to be held liable for the consequences of their policies and not blame their own imprudent actions, conducted in the name of profit, to improve their bottom line. Simply put, it is not fair to hold…… [Read More]

References

Businesses whose employees text or place business-related calls while driving could be found vicariously liable. (2010). Business Wire. FindArticles.com. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0EIN/is_20100125/ai_n48734655/

Employer liability for an employee's bad acts. (2010). Nolo. Retrieved May 2, 2011, from  http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/employer-liability-employees-bad-acts-29638.html 

Leung, Susan. (2004). A new test for vicarious liability. China Staff. FindArticles.com.

Retrieved May 2, 2011, from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa5478/is_200411/ai_n21362609/
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Perspectives of Crime in the US

Words: 2097 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24007414

Sociology of Crime

Sociologists claim that crime is a social construction

The term "crime" refers to various forms of misconduct that are forbidden by the law (Eglin & Hester, 2013). There are different justifications as to shy sociologists classify crimes as a social construction. All social problems are the product of social construction; defining, naming and labeling them into place through which people can make sense of them. It is evident that crime is formed socially. The constructionist angle draws on a varying sociological inheritance, one that looks at the society as a matrix of meaning. It gives a primary role to the procedures of constructing, generating and spreading meanings. Under this perspective, it is impossible to understand reality in a direct and unmediated manner. People will often mediate reality by meaning. Proponents of this school of thought believe that what people experience is the "social construction of reality." How…… [Read More]

References

Eglin, P. & Hester, S (2013). A Sociology of Crime. Toronto: Routledge
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Public Accounting Corporate Accounting and

Words: 3822 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3509043

This role is in response to clients' demands for a single trustworthy individual or firm to meet all of their financial needs. However, accountants are restricted from providing these services to clients whose financial statements they also prepare." (U.S. Department of Labor, ureau of Labor Statistics, 2009)

1. Public Accounting

The work entitled: "The Reality of the CPA's Role" states that modern CPAs work "behind the scenes as trusted advisors in nearly all significant business decisions. Successful accountants display the ability to think strategically and creatively and to be problem solvers and business advisors." (Douglass, 2006) Douglass states that the views of the CPA are widely varied "...whether from the viewpoint of the investing public or from the perspective of the companies that engage CPAs to audit their financial statements or perform other functions. In fact, many people not involved in the business management or accounting profession may perceive CPAs…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Douglass, Kevin (2006) the Reality of the CPA's Role New Jersey CPA Magazine, April 2006. Accounting and Auditing. Online available at: http://www.amper.com/publications/amper-cpa-role.asp

Erard, Brian (1992) Taxation with Representation: An Analysis of the Role of Tax Practitioners in Tax Compliance. Journal of Public Economics 52 (1993) 163-107. North-Holland. Online available at: http://aysps.gsu.edu/isp/files/ISP_SUMMER_SCHOOL_2008_ERARD_TAXATION_WITHOUT_REPRESENTATION.pdf

Financial accounting for Local and State School Systems (2005) Chapter 4: Governmental Accounting. National Center for Education Statistics. U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences. Online available at:  http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2004/h2r2/ch_4.asp 

Garrison, Ray H. And Noreen, Eric W. (2009) What is Managerial Accounting/Cost Accounting. Accounting Management. Online available t: http://www.accountingformanagement.com/
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Juvenile Delinquency Crime Statistics From Chicago Illinois

Words: 2934 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37388382

Juvenile Delinquency

Crime statistics from Chicago, Illinois testify to the increasing number of youth offenders. In 1989, the Chicago police reported that 64% of 274,000 their crimes were committed by individuals under the age of 25; 40% of these crimes were committed by teenagers under 18." (Malmgren, Abbott, & Hawkins, 1999)

The recent headlines show that more and more kids are being expelled from schools for carrying guns, knives and for getting into fistfights. These antisocial acts have become quite common. Not to mention, inner city minority kids used to be the only kids exposed to gang violence or open gang recruiting. But the best 'Gangsta apper' today is white. Eminem is targeting suburban America with his Slim Shady message. And the gangs and the gangsta lifestyle seem to be in vogue. In the wake of the Columbine High School shootings a few years ago where two juvenile delinquents terrorized…… [Read More]

References

Balousek, Marv (1995). Human Touch Key To Saving Juveniles - Experts: Punishment Not Sole Solution. Wisconsin State Journal.

Day, David M. & Hunt, Ann C. (04-01-1996). A Multivariate Assessment Of A Risk Model For Juvenile Delinquency With An 'Under 12 Offender'. Journal of Emotional & Behavioral Disorders. Vol. 4, pg. 66.

Edwards, Willie J. (1996). A Measurement Of Delinquency Differences Between A Delinquent And Nondelinquent Sample: What Are The Implications?. Adolescence. Vol. 31, pg. 973(17).

Maag, John W. & Irvin, Deborah M. (1994). Prevalence and predictors of substance use: A comparison between adolescents with and without... Journal of Learning Disabilities,.
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Globalization Corporate Responsibility in a

Words: 2643 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89561930

By "lifting all boats" and extending the concept of being "our brother's keeper" we begin, as a society, to address basic human rights worldwide.

Question #2: hat role should governments play in regulating commerce to ensure that the rights of people and the environment are sustained? Economist Daniel Litvin has written an article in the journal Foreign Policy ("Raising Human Rights Standards in the Private Sector") worthy of close attention. In the piece he claims the UN's Compact - and the UN's "Human Rights Norms for Businesses" - fail to set "reasonable and well-defined limits" or a "code of conduct" on corporations' responsibilities in the global workplace.

And so, what does he believe governments should do - what role should they play? In the first place, Litvin believes that "many human rights controversies" that involve companies involved in globalization can be attributed to "the lack of a clear dividing line…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Amnesty International. "Human Rights Principles for Companies" / "UN Global Compact: the Nine Principles" / "Clouds of Injustice: Bhopal Disaster." Retrieved 6 March 2007 at http://web.amnesty.org.

Engardio, Pete. "Global Compact, Little Impact." Business Week (issue) 3891 (2004): 86-87.

Litvin, Daniel. "Memo to the President: A Strategy for Business and Human Rights." Foreign

Policy (issue) 139 (2003): 68-72.
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Environmental Crime Economic Globalization and

Words: 2261 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2165518

A company working on such a goal might claim that the intent is to use less pesticides, but really they just want to decrease the cost of production.

Another example of why a food organism might be modified is to make the final product more resilient to the means of distribution, such as what is seen with tomatoes being genetically modified to have more resilient skins, so they can be grown, harvested and distributed in mass. Many think of these types of modifications as positive, for the development of sustainable food growth, to feed a growing population, more efficiently and effectively. In many ways the positive aspects of this trend are good, and yet genetically modified plants and foods also create potential threats. Some examples of this are plants that if left on their own can overcome natural and indigenous plants, such as are seen with grain crops that have…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cook, Guy. Genetically Modified Language: The Discourse of Arguments for GM Crops and Food. New York: Routledge, 2004.

Gaudet, Mary. "Without a Trace: Controversy Buzzes around the Mysterious Disappearance of Bees on Prince Edward Island." Alternatives Journal July 2005: 32.

"Give a Weed an Inch, it'll Take a Smile." The Register-Guard (Eugene, or) 12 June 2005: c1.
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Cultural Issues in Crimes Against Humanity

Words: 4595 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34863415

Culture that Encourages Human ights

Americans were shocked when they learned about the abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib. Or were they? Certainly, the media reported shock and outrage on the part of the public to the unpleasant revelations. But the outrage, if it really existed, has certainly not been a lasting outrage. The White House response to photos of young military personnel sexually assaulting and humiliating prisoners was to imply that only a few poorly supervised bad apple MPs would do such things. President George W. Bush said: "These acts do not represent the values America stands for." However, many Americans do not abhor the treatment of those prisoners at all. In fact, they think there should be more of it. "They do it to us," is commonly heard in restaurants where ordinary people discuss current events. epublican Congressman James Inhofe of Oklahoma dismissed the whole thing by saying,…… [Read More]

References

Ackerman, B. (2004). States of emergency. American Prospect, summer, 15, (9), 40.

Alloway, N. And Gilbert, P. (1998). Video game culture: Playing with masculinity, violence and pleasure. In Howard, S. (Ed.) Wired Up, London: UCL Press.

Barry, J., Hirsh, M., and Isikoff, M. with Hosenball, M. Gutman, R., Gegax, T.T., Scelfo, J., Liu, M., Nordland, R. And B. Dehghanpisheh (2004). The roots of torture. Newsweek, 24 May, 143, (21), 26-34.

Cohen, D. (2003). The American national conversation about (everything but) shame. Social Research, winter, 70, (4), 1075-1108.
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Modern Corporate Social Responsibility

Words: 1853 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78815205

Disability as Diversity

People who are disabled very much face an uphill climb when it comes to surviving and thriving in the workplace. Indeed, the physical and/or mental challenges faced by the disabled are compounded by the way that organizations and the people therein react to them and that includes whether they are hired, what they are hired to do and how people treat the disabled employee upon hire. While much of the overall outlook is grim, a strong organizational culture that is installed and enforced properly via the following of social justice and similar principles can be a tool to make the disabled workers feel more welcome rather than as an outcast or someone that is not as worthy or capable.
Analysis

One seminal work on the matter noted in the introduction that shall be covered in-depth in this report is that of Spataro. When it comes to organizational…… [Read More]

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Marxist Eye on the Contemporary Commercialized Corporate

Words: 2094 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16604257

Marxist Eye on the Contemporary, Commercialized Corporate 'I'"

Karl Marx, although famously, personally ignorant of his own wife's domestic suffering while he labored in the British Library, still provides an ideologically coherent model to examine how materialism, commercialism, and the oppression of women and other ideologically (though not always economically) marginalized groups invisibly occurs within our class-bound society. One of Marx's most basic claims, and one particularly dear to post-modernists, was that although ideas are historically changing and in flux, these ideologies invariably reflect or are a material product of their time and the dominant political economy.

For instance, during the time period when Marx was writing in Victorian England, the ideological products of the bourgeois society included as one of its virtues, the value of 'hard work' or the 'deserving poor' as morally superior to the non-deserving poor. Thus, the exploitation of workers by, for instance, a factory owner,…… [Read More]

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Reducing Crime Through Social Initiatives

Words: 2197 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12666984

Academy Sports + Outdoors

Project Charter

The project charter for this plan, "Operation Midnight Basketball" for Academy Sports + Outdoors, is provided below.

Identification:

The official name of this project is "Operation Midnight Basketball" to be implemented by Academy Sports + Outdoors as described below.

Today, Academy Sports + Outdoors (hereinafter alternatively "Academy" or "the company") is a leading retailers in the sports, outdoor and lifestyle industry offering a wide range of high quality fishing, hunting, and other outdoor merchandise, including camping equipment and gear as well as sports and leisure products, footwear, and outdoor apparel (About Academy, 2014). Headquartered in Texas, Academy operates more than 185 stores in the United States, including stores in, alphabetical order, Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas (About Academy, 2014). The company has a stated corporate social responsibility commitment that is congruent…… [Read More]

References

About Academy. (2014). Academy Sports + Outdoors. Retrieved from http://www.academy.

com/shop/store/company-info.

Academy basketball team sports. (2014). Academy Sports + Outdoors. Retrieved from http://www.academy.com/shop/browse/team-sports-basketball/_/N-935629709.

Chudacoff, H.P. (2007). Children at play: An American history. New York: New York
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Australian Criminal Justice System Respond

Words: 3213 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81904640

Industries that face stiff competition may favor and encourage an aggressive approach from employees that produces rapid results, rather than thoughtful, strategic action. When the gains cannot be realized in the desired time frame, there is a temptation to implement short cuts; resulting in fraud." (Price; Norris, 2009) That however is not a justification, although it prompts some regulations on the way industries operate.

The Law Catches Up

Today the criminal justice system responds to corporate crime much better than before. This is because earlier the scams were an unknown commodity in Australia and it was a U.S. phenomenon. Globalization changed that and now, according to the National Crime Prevention office in Australia the fraudster type of activities in firms were classified as fake billing and invoicing, investments and money chain scams, advance fee frauds, borrowing from the public as in ponzi type scams, the pyramid and money chain, insolvency…… [Read More]

References

Braithwaite, John. (1992) "Penalties for White-Collar Crime"

Retrieved 28 July, 2012 from  http://www.anu.edu.au/fellows/jbraithwaite/_documents/Articles/Penalties_White_1992.pdf 

Braithwaite, John. (1985) "White Collar Crime" Annual Review of Sociology vol. 11, no. 1, pp: 1-25.

"Definition of white collar crime" (from the scanned reference mailed by client -- book title not clear) Please insert book title here
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Criminology One of the Most

Words: 2099 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84688714

In this particular case, it appears that at least two elements of Ms. Stewart's arrest and her subsequent sentencing can be related to consensus theory.

Berle's theory of public consensus focuses on conditions within a civil society, where the consensus of the public forms a continuous although informal check on the powers of decision making held by managers (Moore and eberioux, 2010, p. 1113). In other words, managers and other powerful entities within corporations are subject to the public eye, which should serve as a deterrent for corporate crime. In a more formal way, this public consensus is legalized within guidelines and rules implemented by entities such as the SEC and other government agencies governing business ethics.

In the light of the above, one might therefore state that Martha Stewart's arrest for insider trading is the result of legal and public consensus regarding her guilt. She was found guilty according…… [Read More]

References

Leone, M. (2004, Jun. 4). Martha Stewart Arrested. Retrieved from: http://www.cfo.com/article.cfm/3009528

Moore, M.T. And Reberioux, a. (2010). Corporate Power in the Public Eye: Reassessing the Implications of Berle's Public Consensus Theory. Seattle University Law Review, Vol. 33. No. 4. Retrieved from:  http://digitalcommons.law.seattleu.edu 

PBS NewsHour. (2004, Jul 16). Martha Stewart Sentenced. Retrieved from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/business/july-dec04/stewart_7-16.html
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Regulatory Ethics When Evaluating the

Words: 2228 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18014260

This is a major oversight because as stated above, one of the areas in which the use of former SEC officials seems to have been most successful is in the securing of waivers and releases. In leaving out these areas, the prime evidence in support of the revolving door demonstrates itself to be woefully inadequate. In contrast, the POGO report details a number of problems with this earlier academic study while demonstrating that some of the things the academic study tried to downplay, such as the SEC's tendency to settle rather than pursue charges to their fullest, are actually evidence of SEC regulation being affected by its close relationship with the industry it is meant to regulate (POGO, 2013, p. 28).

The study's findings are persuasive precisely because they are so comprehensive in their dismantling of the primary academic justification of the revolving door. By demonstrating the critical errors in…… [Read More]

References

Assistant Comptroller General. General Accounting Office, General Government Division.

(2000). Studies helped agencies measure or explain program performance. Washington,

DC.

Corporate Crime Reporter. (2013, February 21). Pogo on sec's revolving door. Retrieved from  http://www.corporatecrimereporter.com/news/200/pogo-report-on-secs-revolving-door/
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RICO ACT in Conception and

Words: 4576 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80600205

Moreover, a prosecution of the core leadership of an organization under RICO charges is likely to produce revelations concerning the relationship between leadership and other members who are either guilty of racketeering or some lesser scope of individual crime. This is to say that RICO was essentially designed to push the door open on the activities of such typically obscured enterprises in order to systematically disrupt its initiatives and priorities.

Still, as this investigation finds as a recurrent theme in considered research materials, even when armed with RICO's expansive authorities, there remains a fundamental difficulty in overcoming the effectively obfuscating structure of the modern organized crime enterprise. In the case of the long-ingrained style of activity instituted by La Cosa Nostra, the protective degree to which structure is designed to insulate the activities, connections and implications relating to real decisions-makers and bosses tends to effect the ability of RICO statutes…… [Read More]

Works Cited

ACLU. (2003). How 'Patriot Act 2' Would Further Erode the Basic Checks on Government Power that Keeps America Safe and Free. American Civil Liberties Union. Online at http://www.aclu.org/SafeandFree/SafeandFree.cfm?ID=12161&c=206

Arshadi, N. (1998). Insider Trading Liability and Enforcement Strategy. Financial Management, 27(2), 70-84.

Cornell University Law School (CULS). (1970). Chapter 96-Racketeer Influences and Corrupt Organizations. U.S. Code Collection. Online at http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode18/usc_sup_01_18_10_I_20_96.html

FBI. (2004). Investigative Programs: Organized Crime. Department of Justice: Federal Bureau of Investigation. Online at http://www.fbi.gov/hq/cid/orgcrime/aboutocs.htm
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Classical Criminology Theory The Author Will Apply

Words: 592 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30860945

classical criminology theory. The author will apply the theory of the Lacassagne School which combines Durkheim's determinism plus biological factors. This applies to contemporary criminology in the case of recidivist situations where a criminal will not or can not be reformed. In the opinion of the author, this theory supports a social responsibility perspective. In this case, such a criminology theory would explain the behavior of serial killers who are hopelessly recidivist and justify the death penalty.

The above view would follow logically into neoclassical criminology theory that applies to contemporary criminology. This type of approach supports a social responsibility perspective. If the behavior is caught early enough, it should prevent crime because the criminal is certain that they will punished. For instance, this is the case in situations of direct control whereby punishment is threatened or applied for wrongful behavior and such compliance is rewarded by family, parents or…… [Read More]

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Gang Prevention Program Gangs Contain

Words: 5590 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76787344



George Knox, director of the National Gang Crime esearch Center, teaches law enforcement officers how to search WebPages to pick up on gang member's lingo, territories, and rivalries. He also asserts it is crucial for officers to learn how to "read between the lines" when searching gang members' WebPages. Time on the Web, similar to time on the streets, gives gang investigators the ability to read the hieroglyphics of wall graffiti, and understand Web clues. In addition, "gang identifiers, such as tattoos, graffiti tags, colors and clothing often are embedded in each site" (Gutierrez, 2006, ¶ 27). According to Gutierrez, by studying gang blogs for several hours, one can pick up on subtle word choices, which the gang members consider to be almost holy words. Knox contends that some gangs use the Internet to recruit new members.

Other Efforts to Deal with Gangs

Suppression techniques may be one of the…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

ARISE as a gang prevention program. (2007). ARISE Foundation. Retrieved November 6, 2009

from http://www.ariselife-skills.org/Home/Gangs.aspx ARISE foundation. (2009). Retrieved November 6, 2009 from http://www.ariselife-skills.org/Home/Home.aspx

ARISE life-management skills program. A five-year evaluation. (N.d.). University of Miami.

Retrieved November 10, 2009 from http://www.ariselifeskills.org/docs/pdf/5yearevalexecsummary.pdf
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Traffic Violation Systems The United

Words: 6323 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9988894

The mechanisms that have been put forth to handle issues of day amercement are rudimentary to the knowledge of many people in the U.S. For instance, day Fines is subject to the capabilities of the offenders. It is not a subject imposed to all offenders no with no consideration of their financial stabilities. Nonetheless, offenders who are judged to be within the bracket of paying day charge make it an obligation. The U.S. has state and federal strategies on imprisonment of offenders have received an enormous boost with involvement of the day Fines services.

The federal government of the U.S. has found a more equitable and distributive way of punishing offenders with day fines. Traffic offenders are rampant and active most of the day times. Since they are individuals who operate most of their activities during the daytime, the federal state perceives day fines as a more eloquent way of…… [Read More]

References

Alarid, L.F., & Del, C.R.V. (2011). Community-based corrections. Belmont, CA:

Wadsworth.

Born, G. (1996). International civil litigation in United States courts: Commentary and materials. The Hague: Kluwer Law International.

Cole, G.F., & Smith, C.E. (2006). The American system of criminal justice. Belmont, CA:
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Police Corrupted

Words: 5292 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92625669

Course Number
Police Corruption
A Problem with the law
Name
[Date]

Summary
This paper will focus specifically on police corruption and the ways in which to lessen and decrease instances of police corruption. The first section includes an introduction explaining the effects of police corruption from rapes to murder and how it impacts society. It also expresses the need to act, as the United States becomes more like the exceedingly corrupt African countries of Nigeria and South Africa. Comparison of other countries reveals a lack of authority and government as well as public safety concerns.
The other section explains and identifies the different forms of corruption that happen with police officers including: opportunistic theft, tampering of evidence, and accepting of bribes. When police officers commit these crimes, they are often not prosecuted. This is due to the lack of evidence of witnesses against them. Most police officers are trained to…… [Read More]

References
Aremu, A. O., Pakes, F., & Johnston, L. (2011). The moderating effect of emotional intelligence on the reduction of corruption in the Nigerian Police. Police Practice and Research, 12(3), 195-208. Retrieved July 30, 2014, from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15614263.2010.536724#.U9sFVvldWa8
Beggs, J., & Davies, H. (2009). Police misconduct, complaints, and public regulation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
California Innocence Project. (n.d.). Police Corruption Cases \ Police Misconduct Statistics \ CIP. Retrieved August 1, 2014, from http://californiainnocenceproject.org/issues-we-face/police-misconduct
Einstein, S., & Amir, M. (2003). Police corruption: paradigms, models, and concepts: challenges for developing countries. Huntsville, TX: Office of International Criminal Justice.
Gottschalk, P. (2012). White-Collar Crime and Police Crime: Rotten Apples or Rotten Barrels? Critical Criminology, 20(2), 169-182. Retrieved July 31, 2014, from http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10612-011-9133-0
Lee, H., Lim, H., Moore, D. D., & Kim, J. (2013). How police organizational structure correlates with frontline officer's attitudes toward corruption: a multilevel model. Police Practice and Research, 14(5), 386. Retrieved July 31, 2014, from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15614263.2011.635483#.U9sEofldWa8
Punch, M., & Gilmour, S. (2010). Police corruption: apples, barrels and orchards. Criminal Justice Matters, 79(1), 10-12. Retrieved July 31, 2014, from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09627250903569890#.U9sFwldWa8
Roleff, T. L. (2003). Police corruption. Farmington Hills, MI: Greenhaven Press.
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Dated but it Is Still

Words: 433 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7875368

The article speaks about how legal action and settlements for legal cases that involve corporate fraud rarely emanate from individuals. Even though individuals are ultimately the ones who commit the fraud, even if it's in a systematic and organization fashion within the scope of a corporation, individual settlements are rarely come to or negotiated. ather, the corporation usually pays the legal settlements. This is even true of United States Department of Justice settlements relating to cases where corporations have defrauded the government to the tune of eight billion dollars, such as was the example given in the article. This article relates to the reading as it displays what happens in the legal world when corporate fraud is discovered and just who it affects from a money standpoint and a career standpoint. Generally, the corporation takes the money hit rather than specific people when a fraud is discovered (Schmidt, 2012).

eferences…… [Read More]

References

Mokhiber, R. (1991, December 1). Corporate crime and violence in review. Multinational Monitor. Retrieved September 13, 2012, from .org/" http://www.multinationalmonitor

.org/

hyper/issues/1991/12/mokhiber.html

Schmidt, M. (2012, August 7). More Fraud Settlements for Companies, but Rarely
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Analyzing Critical Criminology

Words: 2256 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14505045

Conflict Theory-The Relationship between Sociology and Criminology

Theorists, on, social conflict propose that crime, in general, is triggered by conflict in the class system, as well as, laws that have been shaped by individuals and groups in power to safeguard their interests and rights. All acts of crime have political nuances, and Quinney refers to this as crime's social reality. Research attempts to confirm the conflict method; on the contrary, have not generated significant results (Seigel, 2000). Moreover, sociologists ponder over the social patterns that exist among social classes and the complications that arise from conflict between such social classes. They try to establish the relationship between deviant behavior and social class. These are some of the considerations and ponderings of sociologists when examining the Social conflict theory. The theory explores issues to do with inequality on societal settings. The theory states that the laws and norms adopted by society…… [Read More]

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Messerschmidt That the Prisons in

Words: 3714 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42977606

More recently, Miedzian (1991) has studied peer pressure, the socialization process, and military impact that has resulted in violence becoming standard behavior in males, and Thompson (1991) has demonstrated that violent acts are more often performed by males with greater masculine gender orientations.

Another slant on this topic was placed by West and Zimmerman (1987) in "Doing Gender," that looked at gender not in terms of a set of traits that are held by individuals, but rather as something people do together in their social interactions. In this case, gender is basically about social interaction and establishing relationships. It is an integral part of all daily interactions. Where a person's actions in "doing gender" simultaneously produce, reproduce, sustain and legitimate the social meanings accorded to gender. The authors state that gender is a fundamental aspect of all social relationships, in terms that no one can possibly not do gender if…… [Read More]

References

Carrigan, C., Connell, R.W., & Lee, J. (1985), Toward a new sociology of masculinity, Theory and Society, 14 (5), 551-604.

Cloward, Richard a. And Lloyd E. Ohlin. 1960. Delinquency and Opportunity: a theory of delinquent gangs. Glencoe, IL: Free Press.

Connell, RW. 1985. Masculinities. Cambridge, Polity Press.

Connell, R.W. And Messerschmidt, J. (2005) Hegemonic Masculinity, Rethinking the Concept Gender and Society. Gender & Society, 19(6), 829-859
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Waste Abuse Fraud and Corruption

Words: 2980 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55120406

" hile there are factors like peer pressure and authority that come into play, some research claims to have isolated significant features of an individual's character that make them more likely to commit acts of fraud, bribery and falsification in the corporate context (27, 2009). For example, those people with "high levels of ambition were more likely to transgress moral codes, competitively stab colleagues in the back and make dubious decisions relating to asset-stripping, disinvestment, and so on" (27, 2009).

Trevino's (1986) work is relevant when it comes to understanding individuals and corruption. There are a couple questions regarding moral personality that come up: first of all, whether or not a person sees an event or issue as a moral problem; the second is how they decide to act in relation to that problem. Kohlberg's theory of cognitive moral development emphasizes the cognitive or reasoning aspect of moral-decision making (604,…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bratsis, Peter. The Construction of Corruption, or Rules of Separation and Illusions of Purity in Bourgeois Societies. Social Texts, 21(4), 9-33.

Burke, Ronald J. & Cooper, Cary L. Research Companion to Corruption in Organizations

(New Horizons in Management). Edward Elgar Publishers, 2009.

Fleming, Peter. & Zyglodopoulos, Stelios C. Charting Corporate Corruption: Agency,
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Securities Law

Words: 1313 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75099828

Corporation Transactions and Misrepresentation of Financial eports

Business law also called commercial law is a branch of civil law that governs business as well as, commercial transactions, and deals with both the private and public law. The branch created to ensure that, they are no exploitation and manipulation of people as well as rules and regulation in order to benefit some members of a business. This means that should one break or manipulate the rules and regulation in his favor. The or she must face the court in accordance with the law. With legal rights of all investors considered as an important element of the business law, we examine the board changes within the filling of the shareholder derivative lawsuits and might not be frivolous. Also, lack of highly competent employees within a business can lead to tremendous losses and to some extent closure of the business in accordance with…… [Read More]

Reference list

Arlen, J. (1994). The Potentially Perverse Effects of Corporate Criminal Liability, the Journal of Legal Studies 23 (June), 833.

Becker, G.S. (1968). "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach." Journal of Political Economy 76 (March/April), 169-217.

Zingales, L. (2004). The Costs and Benefits of Financial Market Regulation, European Corporate Governance Institute working paper 21/2004
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Weber and Marx on Labor in the

Words: 2981 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67220502

eber and Marx on Labor

In the 19th century, leading social theorists such as Karl Marx and Max eber believed that because its many inherent contradictions, the capitalist system would inevitably fall into a decline.

More than a century later, however, the capitalist system is far from dead. Rather, it appears to be further entrenched, encircling the world in the stranglehold of globalization.

Despite the continued growth of capitalism, however, this paper argues that both Marx and eber's writings remain relevant to explaining many aspects of advanced industrial capitalism. In this paper, the Marx and eber's writings on estranged labor are explored in detail, to examine if the labor theories both men used to analyze capitalism and the plight of workers in the 19th century can also be applied to 21st century capitalism.

The first part of this paper discusses Marx's theory of estranged labor, as written in The Economic…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alarcon-Gonzales, Diana and Terry McKinley, "The adverse effects of structural adjustments on working women in Mexico" Latin American Perspectives, 26, 3, May 1999, 103-117. Available from Proquest Database.

A ore, Tom, ed. A Dictionary of Marxist Thought. Second Edition. London: Basil Blackwell, 1991.

Coser, Louis. Masters of Sociological Thought. New York: Harcourt Brace Janovich, 1977.

Lee, Matthew T. And Ermann, David. "Pinto madness as a flawed landmark narrative: an organization of and network analysis." Social Problems, Feb 1999 v46 i1 p30(1). Proquest Database.